Year nine § February 2024

Article

Written by Alejandro Lo Celso  |  November 24, 2023

The Perec super family adds a new style: the Perec Scripte, a script variant that has been a major design and production challenge. Perec Scripte includes two styles of “writing”: bound and unbound letters, both declined in six weights with large linguistic support and many typographic goodies, as well as a decorative version with graphic impact. Here I share with you the secrets of the slow firing of these fonts, a design process that took many years of exploration, drawing, testing, refinement, passion.   Read

Article

Written by Alejandro Lo Celso  |  March 08, 2023

For those of you who know us, you know that we like projects that are hard to classify. This is one of them, and it is one that we like very much, the Perec family: a sans grotesque that has a lot to offer. From its origin it responded to quite complex artistic and conceptual criteria, as a tribute to the multifaceted work of French writer Georges Perec, but over time with the addition of new styles it has become a versatile type system offering a diverse palette of easily combinable forms. Here we share with you a brief overview of the design process and the cuisine of these fonts. Just remember that new Perec styles are being prepared! It is an ongoing project. It could not be otherwise, Georges Perec would have wanted it that way.   Read

Article

Written by Francis Ramel  |  July 28, 2022

Carolinéale is a typeface family whose design I started at the end of 2014, when I integrated the Atelier National de Recherche Typographique, in Nancy (FR). I had then the project to work on a typographic version of Carolingian musical notations. The alphabetical typeface associated with this work has evolved since then. Thanks to the support of the Centre National des Arts Plastiques (FR) and the sharp eye of Alejandro Lo Celso, I was able to create a complete typeface family. On the occasion of its publication by PampaType, I would like to come back to the principles that guided the design of its forms.   Read

Article

Written by Teresita Schultz de Carabobo  |  February 02, 2021

Second and final installment of Tere Schultz’s text on Tuscan letters. Those decorative objects, delicate or extravagant, that inhabit the streets and typographic catalogues of all times, without losing an iota of expressive force. The product of ornamental ingenuity, Tuscan vernaculars dress the street signs of Mexico as much as the stained glass windows of Paris, the ‘fileteados porteños’ of Buenos Aires or the hulls of fishing boats in the Amazon waters. Against this notorious and implausible decorative ubiquity, which alarms many, in the first part of this article Schultz unfolded, like a healing balm, his hypothesis of how the Tuscan style would have been born of a mischievous interpretation of the inscriptions on stone. In this second chapter, it only remains to delight us with some examples of Tuscan vernaculars from some corners of the world.   Read

Article

Written by Teresita Schultz de Carabobo  |  January 24, 2021

Tere Schultz delivers a new literary and typographic divertimento for passionate readers. This time she follows one of her personal fixations: the Tuscan letters. Those ornamental objects, delicate or extravagant, that inhabit streets and typographic catalogs of all times, without losing an iota of expressive force. The product of decorative ingenuity, Tuscan vernaculars dress the street signs of Mexico as much as the stained glass windows of Paris, the ‘fileteado porteño’ of Buenos Aires signs or the hulls of fishing boats in the Amazon waters. However, this decorative ubiquity, notorious and implausible, alarms many. Fortunately, like a healing balm, Schultz will deploy here her original hypothesis, suspiciously unexplored, of how the Tuscan style would have been born from a mischievous interpretation of the stone inscriptions (wrongly) called lapidary. Although perhaps here the term ‘lapidary’ is appropriate, since the idea caught the author strolling through a cemetery. (Warning: sensitive material. Agnostic typographers and designers of little faith, please refrain).   Read

Article

Written by Paule Palacios Dalens  |  July 20, 2020

Printed or filmed, Jean-Luc Godard’s graphic production surprises by its frequency and formal audacity. Whether inserts or credits, trailers or commercials, press kits or special issues, all of his work bears his trademark, even if his signature does not always formally attest to it. A particular facet of his graphic work here concerns his use of typefaces.   Read

Article

Written by Jorge Iván Moreno Majul  |  May 20, 2020

Jorge Iván shares with us the design process and production of his Octothorpe font, plus some other things. He reviews the rise and fall of dry transfer lettering, focusing on the Stripes face, created for that technology, and reveals its unsettling in-use attributes. He finalizes by tackling the process of reanimation of Stripes by way of samples and specimens, and tells us how it ended up becoming a new digital tool, Octothorpe: a typeface with major visual impact that explores new ways of expression by using current resources.   Read

Article

Written by Francis Ramel  |  May 01, 2020

Francis Ramel, member of Nouvelle étiquette, French graphic design bureau based in Metz and in Strasbourg, portrays the challenges and unfolds the design process of this singular project: the design of a bespoke typeface family to be used for the identity and signage system of the cathedral Saint-Étienne de Metz (FR), which turns 800 years old in 2020. This challenging type design task was undertaken jointly by Nouvelle étiquette and the PampaType foundry, which has been a privileged partner of the studio for years.   Read

Article

Written by Jérôme Knebusch  |  May 16, 2019

The following piece is the third article in the ‘type design teaching’ series published in our blog. Jérôme Knebusch wrote this insightful text as part of the pamphlet ‘Quelques réflexions sur Pangramme : learning type design’ to accompany the Pangramme exhibition catalogue edited by the Lorraine school of fine arts, Metz.   Read

Article

Written by Francisco Gálvez Pizarro  |  April 23, 2019

Francisco Gálvez presents to us his daring reattempt at a type categorization, a much broader and versatile one, more suitable to our times. The author rethinks the values of preceding classifications and reinterprets them in a new model, one that does not seek to be a classification in itself but an original instrument to situate and study the diversity of today’s typefaces.   Read

Article

Written by Sébastien Morlighem  |  April 17, 2019

On the occasion of the second edition of the Pangramme exhibition catalog, Sébastien Morlighem was invited to contribute the present text which allows, through his personal insights, to build a photograph of the path that the pedagogy of typography has deployed in France in the last 25 years.   Read

Article

Written by Thomas Huot-Marchand  |  March 31, 2019

This is the first of a series of articles on type design teaching that we will publish in our blog. Thomas Huot-Marchand, French typographer, designer, and director of ANRT (atelier national de recherche typographique / national institute for typographic research) in Nancy, France, presented, with the following text, the 2017 Chaumont edition of the exhibition Pangramme: learning type design originally assembled in 2016 at the ESAL, art school of Lorraine, Metz.   Read

In memoriam

Written by Alejandro Lo Celso  |  November 28, 2018

I’d come across the name Gerard Unger many times in books and publications before actually meeting him in person. A personal encounter preceded by that much fame is always a curious endeavor. And the first thing one thinks of someone that famous is ‘he probably died years ago’. The paradox is that immortality suits best those who we’ve lost. But what’s even stranger is when the enigma of a name read many times becomes a person of flesh and blood, someone who you can have tea with and talk about anything. That was my personal experience with Gerard Unger. And probably for many of his students too. Looking back I now realize all the things his lessons and encounters unleashed in me. I’ll try to make here, as a humble tribute, a personal portrait of him tethered with thoughts and anecdotes, hoping it may help humanize a figure that might have been mythologized, as is often the case with those who’ve had a huge influence in their time.   Read

Type review

Written by Teresita Schultz de Carabobo  |  October 04, 2018

El presente texto, una crítica a la tipografía Amster de Francisco Gálvez, constituía el prólogo que la autora hiciera para una pequeña pero poderosa publicación que aun no ha visto la luz. Hasta tanto esa edición física tome vida, anticipamos aquí este relato inextricable de la filosa pluma de Teresita Schultz que, no sin un puñado de disgresiones místicas que arrojan luz sobre los oscuros meandros de la historia del libro, nos invita a construir una mirada perspicaz frente al diseño de una tipografía, sofisticada y moderna, como es Amster. Tales disgresiones incluyen el diseño de iniciales, la iluminación de manuscritos medievales, las relaciones entre insectos y embutidos, y algunas cosas más. Hacia el final y para sorpresa de todos, este prólogo incluía cartas de lectores al parecer prematuramente anoticiados.   Read

Article

Written by Alejandra Perié  |  August 20, 2018

This year, from March up to June 2018, Alejandro Lo Celso and Guido Ferreyra came to work at my studio AlfarApPress because they needed a space closer to town center to host the internship of Thomas Bouillet. All this allowed me at some point to be a privileged witness of how his work was evolving. Seeing with a certain closeness what the fine work done by typographers today is, and especially, what they carry out passionately in PampaType.   Read

Reseña de libro

Written by José Luis Martín Montesinos  |  July 17, 2018

«Hacer y componer» de Francisco Gálvez (Editorial de la Universidad Católica de Chile) es, sin duda, un libro pedagógico. Como afirma Alejandro Lo Celso en el prólogo, se trata de un trabajo generoso, en el que se percibe la experiencia del autor en su actividad profesional. Como diseñador, tipógrafo, calígrafo y docente. Y, desde luego, esa generosidad se agradece.   Read

Article

Written by Alejandro Lo Celso  |  May 01, 2018

We are proud of this project: The design of a typeface for the Universidad Nacional de Córdoba in Argentina, an educational institution of more than 400 years, the first in the country and one of the earliest in the continent. As part of the celebration for the hundred years of the University Reform, which occurred in this house in 1918, the UNC commissioned PampaType the design of a typeface to address their multiple communication needs. The resulting design, ‘Reforma’, is a multi-form family with diverse styles. In this article we share a bit of context, all the design process, some of our drawings and production details, and a few insights harvested throughout this 3-year fruitful experience.   Read

Artículo

Written by David Kimura  |  February 20, 2018

Hoy en día los diseñadores somos responsables de una parte de la producción editorial que durante siglos había recaído en manos de especialistas: la composición tipográfica. Lamentablemente la evidencia indica que, en general, ésta sufre de un promedio de calidad mediocre. El problema no reside en las herramientas que tenemos a nuestra disposición —el software que usamos hoy día nos permite no sólo igualar, sino sobrepasar la calidad de la composición tipográfica de los siglos anteriores—; estriba en desaprovechar su potencial y, sobre todo, en no estar siquiera conscientes de que hay algo que necesita mejorar. Como nos recuerda Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, “lo esencial es invisible a los ojos”. El presente texto analiza esta cuestión y muestra la manera de resolverlo, mejorando la calidad de nuestro trabajo y reduciendo el tiempo invertido.   Read

Article

Written by Alejandro Lo Celso  |  September 15, 2017

This typeface is named after the astonishing guitar player and singer Atahualpa Yupanqui, a central figure to Argentine folk music. ‘Don Ata’, as he was called, was a wise poet with a particularly sensitive view of the elements of nature as well as of the human condition, all of which he turned into compelling lyrics and magic songs. For years I dreamed about designing a typeface in his name. I imagined a firm, rough voice, though interpreted with delicate curves and a feel of warmth. After a few years of occasional sketching finally a spirit aroused in 2014. The initially vague forms turned into precise letterforms and with time into a family of fonts. Now the type Atahualpa finally sees the light. I’m happy. Here I invite you to unveil all the secrets behind the scene, discover the clues of the inspiration and the design process, and enjoy some footnotes from our design kitchen.   Read

Article

Written by Juan Carlos Cué  |  September 10, 2017

El universo de la tipografía está lleno de sutilezas y detalles, de formas que transmiten ideologías a través de sus trazos. El espécimen tipográfico es el mundo que antecede a la puesta en página y donde sobran pretextos para observar el color de la trama, el contraste, el espacio entre las líneas y las letras; es el lugar donde se originan las combinaciones infinitas de los signos que esperan inertes y que aún no toman sentido en un discurso, pero que son para disfrutarse. Esta reflexión pretende esbozar el vasto mundo de una herramienta tan importante, poco recurrida y bastante desaprovechada en nuestros días. Para entenderla, es preciso conocer sus orígenes y el desarrollo que tuvo en las distintas épocas. (Tercera y última entrega del texto.)   Read

Article

Written by Juan Carlos Cué  |  August 16, 2017

El universo de la tipografía está lleno de sutilezas y detalles, de formas que transmiten ideologías a través de sus trazos. El espécimen tipográfico es el mundo que antecede a la puesta en página y donde sobran pretextos para observar el color de la trama, el contraste, el espacio entre las líneas y las letras; es el lugar donde se originan las combinaciones infinitas de los signos que esperan inertes y que aún no toman sentido en un discurso, pero que son para disfrutarse. Esta reflexión pretende esbozar el vasto mundo de una herramienta tan importante, poco recurrida y bastante desaprovechada en nuestros días. Para entenderla, es preciso conocer sus orígenes y el desarrollo que tuvo en las distintas épocas. (Esta es la segunda de tres entregas del texto.)   Read

Article

Written by Juan Carlos Cué  |  July 31, 2017

El universo de la tipografía está lleno de sutilezas y detalles, de formas que transmiten ideologías a través de sus trazos. El espécimen tipográfico es el mundo que antecede a la puesta en página y donde sobran pretextos para observar el color de la trama, el contraste, el espacio entre las líneas y las letras; es el lugar donde se originan las combinaciones infinitas de los signos que esperan inertes y que aún no toman sentido en un discurso, pero que son para disfrutarse. Esta reflexión pretende esbozar el vasto mundo de una herramienta tan importante, poco recurrida y bastante desaprovechada en nuestros días. Para entenderla, es preciso conocer sus orígenes y el desarrollo que tuvo en las distintas épocas. (Esta es la primera de tres entregas del texto.)   Read

Article

Written by Alejandro Lo Celso  |  April 10, 2017

This essay was the original dissertation I wrote for the MA in Typeface Design at the University of Reading, UK, 2000. Since then it has met some popularity. It was slightly adjusted years later for its publication under TypeCulture.com and also under lpdme.org. Of course some references may feel out of date by now. However I believe its ideas and insights are mostly perennial.   Read

Article

Written by Alejandro Lo Celso  |  January 06, 2017

Segunda y última entrega del 1er capítulo del libro “Tipografía en Latinoamérica. Orígenes e identidad”, editado por Cecilia Consolo y publicado por Blucher en Brasil, 2013. Sus editores han aceptado amablemente publicarlo aquí. Es una mirada retrospectiva y muy personal de la historia de la tipografía europea desde Gutenberg a la era digital. Pretender abarcar semejante lapso de tiempo en tan poco espacio habilita a posibles exageraciones y reduccionismos. El objetivo ha sido intentar provocar al lector a continuar su propia búsqueda. La primera parte toca en los episodios significativos desde el tipo móvil alemán de fines del s. XV, la escuela humanista italiana, Jenson, Manucio y Griffo, la Edad de Oro francesa del s. XVI, de Tory a Garamond y Robert Granjon. La 2da parte retoma en el barroco neerlandés del s. XVII e intenta referir los hitos fundamentales de la producción británica, ibérica, alemana, y holandesa, incluido el empuje en tipo digital de La Haya. A modo didáctico, imágenes comparativas de anatomía y evolución de las formas tipográficas se han sumado al final de esta 2da parte. (Escrito en Ciudad de México, 10 de enero de 2010.)   Read

Article

Written by Feike de Jong  |  December 05, 2016

This detectivesque chronicle written by journalist Feike de Jong reopened the chests of the mysterious case of an early 17th century punch cutter from The Netherlands named Nicolaes Briot. Originally published by the Czech magazine TYPO, in their issue of Spring 2011, the editors have kindly allowed us to reproduce it here. Stay tuned, the second part of this story is under editing. (The Briot project is part of a wider revival program on historical sources carried out by PampaType since 2004. In the case of Briot, it has been so far the result of a collaboration between John Lane and Alejandro Lo Celso.)   Read

Article

Written by Alejandro Lo Celso  |  December 05, 2016

Primera de dos entregas del 1er capítulo del libro “Tipografía en Latinoamérica. Orígenes e identidad”, editado por Cecilia Consolo y publicado por Blucher en Brasil, 2013. Sus editores han aceptado amablemente publicarlo aquí. Es una mirada retrospectiva y muy personal de la historia de la tipografía europea desde Gutenberg a la era digital. Pretender abarcar semejante lapso de tiempo en tan poco espacio habilita a posibles exageraciones y reduccionismos. El objetivo ha sido intentar provocar al lector a continuar su propia búsqueda. La primera parte toca en los episodios significativos desde el tipo móvil alemán de fines del s. XV, la escuela humanista italiana, Jenson, Manucio y Griffo, hasta la Edad de Oro francesa del s. XVI, de Tory a Garamond y Robert Granjon. La 2da parte retoma en el barroco neerlandés del s. XVII e intenta referir los hitos fundamentales de la producción británica, ibérica, alemana, y holandesa, incluido el empuje en tipo digital de La Haya. A modo didáctico, imágenes comparativas de anatomía y evolución de las formas tipográficas en Occidente se han sumado al final de la 2da parte. (Escrito en Ciudad de México, 10 de enero de 2010.)   Read

Article

Written by Alejandro Lo Celso  |  November 23, 2016

This short article touches on the issue of typeface revivalism. It describes the early enthusiasm of recovering type classics in the beginning of 20th century; then it states a revival case study under its multiple attempts; and finally discusses some polemic matters around the subject. This text was part of the output as a student of the MA in Typeface Design, at the University of Reading, in May 2000. The good parts shall be credited to my tutor at the time, Dr. Christopher Burke. On the contrary all the mistakes are mine. In further texts we shall come back to this extremely important subject.   Read

Article

Written by Alejandro Lo Celso  |  December 24, 2004

I wrote this essay in 2000 when I was a student at the MA in Type Design at the University of Reading. I intended to explore the history and development of multi-style type families across the 20th century. Nowadays the idea of 'series' is much present in current type industry, almost every new family comes in different styles. Fluid digital technology on one side, the constant push of the font industry on the other, have all made type design to challenge traditional classification approaches. In that sense I think this text has still some contribution to make.   Read